I wrote the following to a well-known consultant corporate training company:

“Would you be interested in including an Englishman as a trainer on your team?

I live in Singapore, run a professional audio studio and work predominantly as a sound designer, mixer and voice producer. I am well-educated, familiar with corporate cultures and codes of practice, and can teach/train pretty well. People say I’m a likeable trainer!

I’d like to become involved in consultant corporate training where there’s a need for an English trainer, and look forward to hearing back from you.”

If you’re a big company that does corporate training, you’d probably be peeved that anyone would have the temerity to think they could just walk off the street and into your industry with no experience and expect to start earning big bucks.

So when I get the same from a corporate trainer wanting to get into the voice over business, am I wrong to roll my eyes? Here’s the actual email I received:

“Would you be interested in including an Englishman as a voice over artist on your team?

I live in Singapore, run a small wine business and work predominantly as a consultant corporate trainer. I am well-educated, well-spoken and articulate, and can write/edit pretty well. People say I have a nice voice!

I’d like to become involved in voice over work for commercials or corporate videos where there’s a need for a male English accent, and look forward to hearing back from you.”

I’ve had non-industry friends tell me that maybe it’s someone following their dream and I should more welcoming, but when I turn the tables and substitute a scenario of me approaching a Fortune 500 company as someone with no relevant experience looking for top-end work, they understand why emails like this end up in the trash.